Response

Officials plan to move two vessels from behind Ever Given to make room for the refloating operation. Fuel, ballast water, and several containers were removed from the ship to help lighten it as heavy machinery, including an excavator, worked to dig the bow out. Eight tugboats are assisting in the attempt to pull it free. Peter Berdowski, Chief Executive of Royal Boskalis Westminster, stated that the operation "can take days to weeks".

On 25 March, the Suez Canal Authority (SCA) suspended navigation through the Suez Canal until Ever Given could be refloated. The same day, Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi's advisor on seaports stated that he expected the canal to be cleared in "48–72 hours, maximum". The following day, the Suez Canal Authority said that its dredging operations were about 87 percent complete.

On 26 March the SCA accepted an offer made by a United States Navy assessment team of dredging experts to assist in efforts to remove the ship.

On 27 March the SCA said that 14 tugboats were trying to take advantage of that day's high tide and that more would arrive the following day if the latest attempt failed. Yukito Higaki, president of owners Shoei Kisen, reported that the ship did not appear to be damaged, saying "The ship is not taking water. Once it refloats, it should be able to operate." There is no timeline of when the canal might be reopened; as the situation is proving to be a difficult one to resolve. Additional delays to shipping might also persist after the Ever Given is freed from it's current predicament, as delayed vessels might face busy ports and additional delays before offloading. As of 27 March, more than 300 ships were delayed at both ends and in the middle of the canal, with many more still approaching or having altered their paths.

Global economic impact


Traffic jam in the Gulf of Suez caused by the obstruction as seen by the Sentinel-1 satellite

Maritime and logistics experts have warned that this incident will likely result in shipping delays of everyday items for customers around the world. Maritime historian Sal Mercogliano told the Associated Press, "Every day the canal is closed ... container ships and tankers are not delivering food, fuel and manufactured goods to Europe and goods are not being exported from Europe to the Far East." Lloyd's List estimates the value of the goods delayed each hour at US$400 million, and that every day it takes to clear the obstruction will disrupt an additional US$9 billion worth of goods.

Michael Lynch, president of Strategic Energy & Economic Research, attributed a rise in oil prices to "people buying in after recent declines in oil prices, with the Suez closing the trigger factor", and James Williams, energy economist at WTRG Economics said that due to existing stocks "a few days of slowdown in [oil] delivery is not critical to the market". The event will only delay goods, which might only impact industries with existing shortages such as with semiconductors. To mitigate shortages of goods in the long term, future shipments can be ordered earlier than normal until the difference has been made up. However, a consultant at another firm noted that even a short-term disruption at the Suez Canal would have a domino effect for several months along the supply chain.

The default alternative route for maritime traffic between Asia and Europe is to go around the African continent via the Cape of Good Hope, a trip of some 6,100 nmi (11,300 km) taking approximately 10 to 12 more days, with this alternative having already being taken by some ships as of March 26. Russia has used this incident to promote its Arctic shipping routes as a shorter alternative to carrying goods around Africa.

Concerns about piracy, due to the unprecedented concentration of valuable shipping in such a small area, has prompted shipping companies to make inquiries to the Bahrain-based United States Fifth Fleet about security.

See also

Egypt portal

21st Century Maritime Silk Road

Yellow Fleet, a group of fifteen ships trapped in the Suez Canal, from 1967 to 1975, as a result of the Israel–Egypt Six-Day War

References

^ "Ever Given: Container Ship, IMO 9811000". Vessel Finder. Archived 25 March 2021.

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This page was last edited on 27 March 2021, at 21:41 (UTC).

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